Drugs


Perceptual changes that can accompany Hallucinogen persisting perception disorder.

posted 1 year ago with 117 notes


rxrated:

Featured Drug of the week-  Imipramine HCL
Brand name:  Tofranil
Available doses:  10, 25, and 50 mg tabs
Indication:  Antidepressant; tricyclic antidepressant (TCA); also may be prescribed for panic disorder or enuresis (inability to control urination)
Side effects:  impotence, nightmares, blurred vision, xerostomia (dry mouth), Pepto symptoms (upset, diarrhea, vomiting, stomach pains, etc.); Serious include confusion or seizures, extreme thirst accompanied with nausea/vomiting, shortness of breath, unsteady or rapid heart beat, and numb or weakness.  The daily allowance is 300mg of this medication (often given in 3-4 divided doses).  Grapefruit can impair the absorption of the drug and drug therapy of this medication should be taken strictly as abrupt in-adherence can cause side effects or suicidal thoughts. 
Drug Interactions:  Products containing phenylephrine, ephedrine, epinephrine, or pseudoephedrine (as this increases the reuptake in the neurotransmitter), phosphates (i.e. bisacodyl seizure risk), buproprion (seizure risk), medications for blood pressure (i.e. amiodarone, clonidine), SSRIs (serotonin syndrome), legend potassium medications (upper GI tract injury), iodinated radiocontrast agents (seizure risk), MAOIs, barbiturates (decreased hepatic metabolism), albuterol (raised blood pressure), aspirin, antihistamines (diphenhydramine for it’s drowsiness effects).  

rxrated:

Featured Drug of the week-  Imipramine HCL

Brand name:  Tofranil

Available doses:  10, 25, and 50 mg tabs

Indication:  Antidepressant; tricyclic antidepressant (TCA); also may be prescribed for panic disorder or enuresis (inability to control urination)

Side effects:  impotence, nightmares, blurred vision, xerostomia (dry mouth), Pepto symptoms (upset, diarrhea, vomiting, stomach pains, etc.); Serious include confusion or seizures, extreme thirst accompanied with nausea/vomiting, shortness of breath, unsteady or rapid heart beat, and numb or weakness.  The daily allowance is 300mg of this medication (often given in 3-4 divided doses).  Grapefruit can impair the absorption of the drug and drug therapy of this medication should be taken strictly as abrupt in-adherence can cause side effects or suicidal thoughts. 

Drug Interactions:  Products containing phenylephrine, ephedrine, epinephrine, or pseudoephedrine (as this increases the reuptake in the neurotransmitter), phosphates (i.e. bisacodyl seizure risk), buproprion (seizure risk), medications for blood pressure (i.e. amiodarone, clonidine), SSRIs (serotonin syndrome), legend potassium medications (upper GI tract injury), iodinated radiocontrast agents (seizure risk), MAOIs, barbiturates (decreased hepatic metabolism), albuterol (raised blood pressure), aspirin, antihistamines (diphenhydramine for it’s drowsiness effects).  

posted 1 year ago via rxrated with 6 notes


Desomorphine (dihydrodesoxymorphine, Permonid) is an opiate analogue invented in 1932 in the United States that is a derivative of morphine, It has sedative and analgesic effects, and is around 8-10 times more potent than morphine
Russian,for home-made desomorphine is “krokodil" (крокодил, crocodile), reportedly due to the scale-like appearance of skin of its users and the derivation from chlorocodide. Due to difficulties in procuring heroin combined with easy and cheap access to over-the-counter pharmacy products containing codeine in Russia, use of “krokodil” has been on the increase. Since the home-made mix is routinely injected immediately with little or no further purification, "krokodil" has become notorious for producing severe tissue damage, phlebitis and gangrene, sometimes requiring limb amputation in long-term users. The amount of tissue damage is so high that addicts’ life expectancies are said to be as low as two to three years.

Desomorphine (dihydrodesoxymorphinePermonid) is an opiate analogue invented in 1932 in the United States that is a derivative of morphine, It has sedative and analgesic effects, and is around 8-10 times more potent than morphine

Russian,for home-made desomorphine is “krokodil" (крокодил, crocodile), reportedly due to the scale-like appearance of skin of its users and the derivation from chlorocodide. Due to difficulties in procuring heroin combined with easy and cheap access to over-the-counter pharmacy products containing codeine in Russia, use of “krokodil” has been on the increase. Since the home-made mix is routinely injected immediately with little or no further purification, "krokodil" has become notorious for producing severe tissue damage, phlebitis and gangrene, sometimes requiring limb amputation in long-term users. The amount of tissue damage is so high that addicts’ life expectancies are said to be as low as two to three years.

posted 1 year ago with 13 notes

Ohio High School Student: 17-Year-Old Kingpin Arrested In Major Drug Bust

Warren County, Ohio — An Ohio high school student has been arrested by police, who allege he is a drug kingpin, who ran a multimillion dollar ring, which distributed high-grade marijuana throughout two school districts, netting about $20,000 per month.

Yahoo News reports that when cops raided the 17-year-old’s bedroom, they found $6,000 in cash. Because the student was a minor (16) at the time of the drug deals, Warren County police have not released his name, and Prosecutor David Fornshell stated the boy will be tried in juvenile court.

According to ABC News, Cops were first tipped off last year to the 17-year-old’s drug ring when they received a tip that a hydroponic strain of marijuana was being sold for $350-$400 per ounce in the Mason school district near Cincinnati. Prosecutor Fornshell stated:

“The undercover officer uncovered six students or former students working for that individual and trafficking drugs in two school districts. The group supplied an overwhelming amount of marijuana in the Mason and King school districts.”

After the tip, an undercover agent began buying from the ring at Mason High School, where the teenager was enrolled. There, they uncovered the ring run by the 17-year-old student who is now in custody.

Fox News reports that Fornshell went on to say:

“There were strict orders not to sell at (the school) because you would get caught and the punishment would be severe.”

The Warren County Prosecutor described the teen as seeming “like someone who’d be in a church youth group or honor program,” saying that, ”he clearly had a high level of intelligence, but it was very misguided.”

Drug Task Force Commander John Burke described the drug ring by saying:

“He was selling to six other people who were kind of like his lieutenants. Then they were distributing the drugs to other high school students.”

Through the 17-year-old kingpin, authorities were able to trace the drugs back to the source, tracing the supply to three different individuals who were growing the high-grade marijuana from houses in Norwood and Hamilton, as well as a furniture warehouse in Blue Ash. Burke stated that the adults, who range from age 20 to 58, were indicted on Friday, but were still being rounded up on Monday. They will all face multiple charges, which include possession, cultivation, and trafficking marijuana.

posted 1 year ago with 4 notes

Adderall Capsules 

Adderall Capsules 

posted 1 year ago via contradict with 40 notes

Animated picture of the chemical structure of Methylenedioxymethamphetamine, also known as ecstasy.

Animated picture of the chemical structure of Methylenedioxymethamphetamine, also known as ecstasy.

posted 1 year ago with 5 notes

samseudo:

“F.D.A. Won’t Order Doctors to Get Pain-Drug Training”

“The Food and Drug Administration, overriding the advice of an expert panel, said Monday that it would not require doctors to have special training before they could prescribe long-acting narcotic painkillers that can lead to addiction…But the agency said companies that make the drugs, like OxyContin, fentanyl and methadone, would be required to underwrite the cost of voluntary programs aimed at teaching doctors how to best use them.”


“Over the last decade, overdose deaths related to the abuse and misuse of long-acting narcotics have reached epidemic proportions…There are also growing concerns that long-term use of the drugs can cause a variety of problems, such as sharply reduced hormone production, sleep apnea and increased falls and fractures in people over 70.”

(Source: NYTimes)

samseudo:

“F.D.A. Won’t Order Doctors to Get Pain-Drug Training”

“The Food and Drug Administration, overriding the advice of an expert panel, said Monday that it would not require doctors to have special training before they could prescribe long-acting narcotic painkillers that can lead to addiction…But the agency said companies that make the drugs, like OxyContin, fentanyl and methadone, would be required to underwrite the cost of voluntary programs aimed at teaching doctors how to best use them.”

“Over the last decade, overdose deaths related to the abuse and misuse of long-acting narcotics have reached epidemic proportions…There are also growing concerns that long-term use of the drugs can cause a variety of problems, such as sharply reduced hormone production, sleep apnea and increased falls and fractures in people over 70.”

(Source: NYTimes)


posted 1 year ago via contradict with 13 notes